Author: careeroftheweek

Social work assistant (Wk 3 – Sept. 2018)

The aging population means that the human health and social work activities sector will experience the most growth over the coming years, with almost 320,000 or 23% of all new jobs that will be created by 2022.

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Community support worker, home care officer, social services assistant

Social work assistants give advice, guidance and support to help people with their physical, emotional and social needs.

How to become

You can get into this job through:

  • a college course
  • an apprenticeship
  • applying directly if you have relevant experience

College

Qualifications in health and social care may help you to find a job. Level 2 or 3 courses in health and social care will include work experience placements, which will help when you apply for a job afterwards.

Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • 2 or more GCSEs at grade 9 to 3 (A* to D) for a level 2 course
  • 4 or 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C) for a level 3 course

More information

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Apprenticeship

You may be able to get into this job through an intermediate or advanced apprenticeship for the children and young people’s workforce, or youth work.

Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • some GCSEs, usually including English and maths, for an intermediate apprenticeship
  • 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C), usually including English and maths, for an advanced apprenticeship

More information

Volunteering and experience

Salary

Starter: £12,500 to £16,000

Experienced: £17,000 to £22,000

Highly Experienced: £25,000 (manager)

You may work for a specialist recruitment agency. Hourly rates for agency work can be between £7 and £11.

These figures are a guide.

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Direct application

You could apply directly after getting experience in a care role, like a care worker or a healthcare assistant in a:

  • hospital
  • hospice
  • care home
  • children’s home

You’ll usually need a GCSE in English for this route.

More information

Career tips

Experience of caring within your own family or community can help you get into this job.

Further information

Think Care Careers has more information and advice about careers in adult social care.

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What it takes

Skills and knowledge

You’ll need:

  • counselling skills including active listening and a non-judgemental approach
  • sensitivity and understanding
  • patience and the ability to remain calm in stressful situations
  • to be flexible and open to change
  • the ability to work well with others
  • knowledge of psychology
  • the ability to accept criticism and work well under pressure
  • active listening skills
  • basic digital skills for communicating and recording information

Restrictions and requirements

You’ll need to:

What you’ll do

Day-to-day tasks

Your day-to-day tasks may include:

  • contacting clients and following up enquiries
  • advising clients and their families about help that’s available
  • visiting people at home to check how they are
  • following a social worker’s care plan, and sometimes creating your own
  • keeping records and writing reports
  • keeping up to date with the law
  • going to meetings with your department and other agencies
  • liaising with other health and care professionals

Working environment

You could work in the community, at a children’s care home, at a client’s home, in an office, in an NHS or private hospital or at an adult care home.

Your working environment may be emotionally demanding.

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Career path and progression

With experience you could work towards qualifying as a social worker. You could do this yourself, or with support and funding from your employer.

You could also move into related careers like family support work or counselling.

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Training opportunities

Apprenticeships in England

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Visual merchandiser (Wk 2 – Sept 2018)

Economic modellers EMSI have analysed what the jobs market is going to look like in 2022. From this we know the number of available jobs is expected to continue to grow, but the all important question is what are the jobs going to be and how do young people’s aspirations match up to the realities of the jobs market they will enter? Only just over 2% of teens questioned wanted to work in the wholesale and retail trade, but the industry makes up 15% of available jobs! So let’s think beyond ‘shop assistant’ or ‘shelf stacker’ and start looking at some of the careers associated with this industry.

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1. Entry requirements

There are no set entry requirements, but sales assistant experience could be helpful.

Qualifications in art and design, retail design, or retail skills may also be useful.

You could get into this job through an apprenticeship.

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2. Skills required

You’ll need:

  • creativity and imagination
  • design skills to create product displays
  • technical drawing skills
  • IT skills to use computer-aided design (CAD) software
  • attention to detail

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3. What you’ll do

You’ll usually work in stores’ fashion and homeware departments. Your day-to-day tasks will include:

  • designing product displays and floor plans, or following plans from head office
  • drawing designs and plans by hand or computer
  • using space and lighting creatively
  • sourcing materials like models, props, signs and equipment
  • arranging displays and dressing dummies
  • teaching sales staff how to display goods
  • producing brand guidelines so all stores have the same look and feel

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4. Salary

Starter: £12,000 to £16,000

Experienced: £20,000 to £25,00

Highly Experienced: £25,000 to £55,000

These figures are a guide.

5. Working hours, patterns and environment

You’ll work 37 to 40 hours a week, including evenings.

The job is physically demanding. It involves climbing ladders and lifting goods. Working in shop windows can be hot and cramped.

You could be based at head office or at a store. You could travel to different branches to set up displays.

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6. Career path and progression

With experience, you could progress to team leader, then visual merchandising manager.

You could also move into retail, exhibition or interior design, or set up your own business creating one-off displays

You could become a member of the British Display Society to increase your job prospects.

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Software Developer – Week 1, Sept 2018

A new £8.4m advanced digital office park creating 54,000sq ft of state-of-the-art office space providing high value jobs for hundreds of people is being built at Euxton Lane after Chorley Council won financial backing from Europe.

Councillor Alistair Bradley, Chorley Council leader, said:  “Digital technology is the business of the future and this development will put Chorley right at the centre of digital technology in Lancashire.

“We are really excited to be creating such a high quality business facility in Chorley which will create the wealth of tomorrow with hundreds of well paid and skilled jobs.

“This is one of the most significant business developments to happen in Chorley for a generation and it will drive forward economic growth. It has been estimated by independent experts that it could generate an additional £18.5 million for the Chorley economy.”

1. Entry requirements

You may be able to get into this job through an apprenticeship if you’ve developed some programming skills and can show a strong interest in the subject.

The TECH Partnership has details of digital apprenticeships at all levels.

It also has details of the Software Development for Business degree available at some universities.

Other suitable qualifications are a foundation degree, HND or degree in computing or a related subject, like:

  • computer science
  • information technology
  • software development
  • software engineering
  • mathematics
  • business information systems

Some companies will accept you onto their graduate training scheme without an IT-related degree if you understand programming languages and frameworks, project management and development methods.

You could also study for a postgraduate IT conversion qualification.

The Chartered Institute for IT (BCS) has information about training and qualifications.

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2. Skills required

You’ll need:

  • the ability to understand the development process
  • some programming knowledge
  • the ability to work under pressure and to deadlines
  • maths skills

3. What you’ll do

You could work in a wide range of businesses and industries, public services, utilities, defence and research.

You’ll work closely with project managers, business analysts and graphic designers, to find out what the client wants and the best way to achieve it.

Usually, you’ll work in a team.

You could work on a wide variety of projects, from financial databases to robotics to apps for phones and tablets. You may use a number of programming languages or project management tools.

Your day-to-day tasks may include:

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  • talking through requirements with the client and the development team
  • taking part in technical design and progress meetings
  • writing or amending computer code
  • testing software and fixing problems
  • keeping accurate records of the development process, changes and results
  • carrying out trials and quality checks before release
  • maintaining and supporting systems once they’re up and running

As an experienced developer, you may supervise a programming team and provide feedback on coding work.

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4. Salary

Starter: £20,000 to £30,000

Experienced: £30,000 to £40,000

Highly Experienced: £50,000 to £70,000

These figures are a guide.

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5. Working hours, patterns and environment

You’ll usually work 37 to 40 hours a week. You may need to do overtime and weekend work to meet deadlines or to fit around your client’s business.

You’ll be office-based but may travel to meet clients and fulfil contracts. You may need a full driving licence.

 

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6. Career path and progression

With experience, you could become a senior developer, with team or project management, planning or research responsibilities. You could move into related areas like systems design, IT architecture and business systems analysis.

You could also set up your own business or work as a consultant.

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Meteorologist (Wk 34)

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As the weather is currently such a ‘hot’ topic!

1. Entry requirements

You’ll usually need a degree in a related subject like:

  • physics
  • maths
  • environmental studies
  • geography
  • computer science

You might also need a postgraduate qualification.

 

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Some Met Office support roles may not need a degree, but you must have:

  • 2 A levels at grade C or above in maths or physics
  • 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C) including English

The Met Office offers some summer placements, work experience positions, and has more information about becoming a meteorologist.

The Royal Meteorological Society also lists degree courses and postgraduate courses that can help you get into this career.

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2. Skills required

You’ll need:

  • the ability to analyse and present complex data
  • excellent mathematical and computing skills
  • excellent written and verbal communication skills

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3. What you’ll do

You’ll specialise in forecasting or research.

As a forecaster you’ll:

  • collect data from satellite images, radar, remote sensors and weather stations
  • measure air pressure, wind, temperature and humidity
  • predict the weather by analysing information and using computer programmes
  • give weather information and reports to customers

As a researcher you’ll:

  • study weather patterns and climate change
  • improve computer predictions
  • use research to predict floods
  • study how the weather affects the spread of pollution or disease

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4. Salary

Starter: £20,000

Experienced: £25,00 to £35,000

Highly Experienced: £60,000 and over (manager)

These figures are a guide.

5. Working hours, patterns and environment

As a forecaster or observer you’ll work 30 to 40 hours a week, including shifts and at weekends.

As a researcher you’ll work 30 to 40 hours a week, Monday to Friday.

You’ll work in an office, but may sometimes have to travel to remote places, or to attend conferences in the UK and overseas.

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6. Career path and progression

With experience you could manage a team of weather forecasters. You could also move into teaching and train future forecasters and scientists.

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Army officer (Week 33 – June)

Army officers command, manage and motivate teams of soldiers.

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1. Entry requirements

You’ll need to:

  • be aged between 18 and 28 years and 11 months
  • meet the British army nationality and residency rules
  • get a GP’s medical report and pass a full army medical

You’ll also usually need:

  • 7 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C), or equivalent, including English, maths and a science or foreign language
  • 2 A levels (or equivalent) with 72 UCAS Tariff points

All officer roles are open to all genders, apart from Infantry, which will be open to women towards the end of 2018.

The recruitment process involves an interview and going to the Army Officer Selection Board (AOSB).

You’ll also need clearance from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) and a security check.

You could become a volunteer part-time officer with your local Army Reserve unit. You’ll need to be between 17 years and 9 months, and 48 years and 9 months.

If you’re between 12 and 18 you could join the Army Cadet Force which will help you understand the roles and responsibilities of an officer in the armed forces.

 

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2. Skills required

To be an army officer, you’ll need:

  • excellent communication skills
  • the ability to lead and motivate others
  • the ability to act quickly and make decisions under pressure
  • teamworking skills
  • organisational skills
  • IT skills

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3. What you’ll do

Your duties will depend on the section you work in and the type of job you do.

You might work in a combat role as:

  • an infantry platoon commander leading a team of 30 trained soldiers on operations
  • a helicopter pilot officer with responsibility for your crew and supporting ground troops
  • a tank troop officer in charge of 12 men and their vehicles
  • an artillery troop officer leading a team of 30 soldiers and in charge of weaponry

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You might work in medicine and healthcare as:

  • an adult heath nurse caring for injured soldiers in demanding situations
  • a medical support officer or dental officer looking after the health of army personnel and their families
  • a veterinary officer working with military animals

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You could also work in:

  • transport and Logistics as a logistic troop commander
  • engineering and maintenance as an engineering troop commander
  • intelligence, communications and IT as an intelligence officer
  • support and HR as a military police officer of a chaplain

You’ll be responsible for the operational effectiveness, training, discipline, welfare and career development of the soldiers under your command.

4. Salary

Starter: £26,000 (during training) to £31,000 (2nd Lieutenant)

Experienced: £40,000 (Captain)

Highly Experienced: £102,000 (Brigadier)

Your pay will depend on your rank and how long you’ve served.

You may receive extra pay if you work in a specialist role, like parachutist, diver, or in the Special Forces.

Medical and dental care is free. You’ll also get help towards the cost of food and housing. If you live in army accommodation, the rent is taken from your salary.

You’ll get allowances if you work overseas.

These figures are a guide.

 

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5. Working hours, patterns and environment

Your working hours will depend on which part of the armed forces you work in. During exercises and operations you may work long and irregular hours.

You could be posted in the UK or overseas, and may be away from your family for long periods of time.

Depending on your role and regiment, you may be based in an office, engineering workshop or field hospital.

 

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6. Career path and progression

With training and experience, you could move up through the ranks from Lieutenant to Captain, Major, Lieutenant Colonel and beyond.

You could move into a wide range of careers once you leave the army. The Officer’s Association gives advice and support to officers on finding a career outside the army.

The Career Transition Partnership and Quest also have information on careers outside the armed forces.

 

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Footballer (Wk. 32 – June)

Football player, professional football player … well, it is the World Cup after all!

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1. Entry requirements

There are no set requirements, but you’ll need football playing talent and physical fitness.

From the age of 9 years you’re eligible to join an academy run by a league club. If you’re under 12, you must live within an hour’s travelling distance. If you’re aged between 13 and 16, you must be able to travel within 90 minutes.

When an academy takes you on, they’ll ask you to sign schoolboy forms which may be renewed every 1 to 2 years.

At age 16, the club will decide whether to put you on its Youth Training Scheme. There are a few scholarships available. You’ll be expected to continue with your education at this point.

You could be on this scheme for up to 3 years. If you’re making progress, you could be put in the Reserves.

Another option, if you’re 16 to 19, is to get a place on the SkillsActive Advanced Apprenticeship in Sporting Excellence (AASE).

At age 19 you may be offered a contract to play for the club, or you may be released into a central pool for other clubs to make you an offer. These may be lower-ranking than the one you’ve trained with.

 

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2. Skills required

You’ll need:

  • exceptional footwork and technical skills
  • the ability to cope with the stress of top matches

3. What you’ll do

The level you’ll play at depends on which league your club is in. This can change from year to year.

Your day-to-day activities may include:

  • training hard to improve your skills and fitness
  • discussing tactics and mental attitudes
  • watching videos of matches to analyse your strengths and weaknesses
  • getting fitness advice from physiotherapists and coaches
  • taking advice from nutritionists about general diet and match-day food
  • playing matches against teams in your league

You may also give interviews to the media or do charity work.

 

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4. Salary

Your salary will vary widely depending on your reputation as a player, and on the club’s finances. You may earn extras like appearance fees, sponsorship and bonuses based on performances and results.

 

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5. Working hours, patterns and environment

You’ll train most days. Match fixtures are usually evenings and weekends. You’ll travel with your club or team to matches all over the UK or abroad, so you may spend time away from home.

6. Career path and progression

You could progress by transferring to a club higher up in the football leagues.

You could move into related careers like coaching, fitness instruction, refereeing, management, sports development or journalism.

 

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Quantity surveyor (Wk 31 – June)

Quantity surveyors oversee construction projects, managing risks and controlling costs.

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1. Entry requirements

You’ll need a degree or professional qualification accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). This can be a quantity surveying degree or a postgraduate conversion course from any degree. Useful subjects are construction, structural or civil engineering, mathematics, geography, economics or land studies.

You could also start work as a junior or trainee quantity surveyor, a surveying technician or surveying assistant, then study to become a quantity surveyor.

You could also get into this job with an apprenticeship.

You’ll need to be a member of RICS (MRICS) to become a fully qualified chartered surveyor. For this you’ll need to complete the Assessment of Professional Competence (APC).

 

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2. Skills required

You’ll need:

  • budgeting skills
  • excellent IT and maths skills
  • organisational and planning skills
  • negotiation and leadership skills

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3. What you’ll do

You could work in the public sector for a local authority, housing association or government department.

You could also work in the private sector for a building contractor, property company, civil engineering or architecture firm.

Your day-to-day tasks may include:

  • finding out a client’s needs and assessing if their plans are feasible
  • working out quantities and costs of materials, time and labour for tenders
  • negotiating contracts and work schedules
  • advising on legal matters, including risks and disputes
  • monitoring sub-contractors and stages of construction
  • writing regular reports on costs and preparing accounts for payment
  • keeping up to date with construction methods and materials
  • following health and safety and building regulations

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4. Salary

Starter: £18,000 to £25,000

Experienced: £25,000 to £50,000

Highly Experienced: £50,000 to £80,000 (senior)

These figures are a guide.

5. Working hours, patterns and environment

You’ll usually work Monday to Friday, 8.30am to 5pm. You may work evenings or weekends. Hours may be longer if you work on-site as a contractor.

You’ll spend time in an office and visiting building sites.

You’ll usually need a full driving licence.

 

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6. Career path and progression

With experience, you could become a senior quantity surveyor or move into senior project management, supply chain management, consultancy work or self-employment.

You could specialise in areas like planning, risk assessment or contract disputes.

Another option is to move into lecturing at a university or college.

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