Social media manager (Wk. 10, Dec)

You all use social media on a daily basis, but you could also influence what you and others see.  Whether you are a creative type or more interested in business and marketing, there could be a role for you in this fast growing sector.

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1. Entry requirements

There are no set requirements but some employers may expect you to have a degree. Relevant subjects include:

  • advertising
  • media and communications
  • digital marketing
  • journalism
  • public relations
  • business management

You could get into this job without a degree if you have the skills and experience in areas like marketing, advertising or PR.

You can do college courses in social media and business.

You could also start as an assistant manager and work your way up.

You’ll usually need some knowledge and experience of social media. To get experience you could:

  • manage your own social media profiles
  • volunteer to manage social media for a charitable organisation
  • ask to get involved in social media sites of the company you already work for

You’ll need excellent IT skills as you’ll be using social media software and tools. You’ll also need knowledge of search engine optimisation (SEO) methods and ‘key’ or ‘searched for’ words to drive more users to your social media site.

Experience of graphic design and digital editing software can help. You can use these skills to make your social media posts better by adding videos, photos and infographics.

You could get into this job through a creative and digital media apprenticeship.

iCould has a video interview with a social media assistant.

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2. Skills required

You’ll need:

  • an eye for detail and the ability to work accurately
  • the ability to deal with more than one task at a time
  • creativity
  • presentation skills
  • an analytical approach to data
  • writing skills

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3. What you’ll do

You’ll monitor and upload content to sites like:

  • Facebook and Twitter
  • Instagram and Pinterest
  • YouTube and Vine

Your day-to-day duties may include:

  • updating social media sites
  • writing blogs, articles and posts
  • responding to social media posts and developing discussions
  • checking online for company mentions and customer feedback
  • searching for interesting posts, news and articles to attract site visitors
  • overseeing competitions and campaigns promoting your company
  • taking part in conferences and group chat relevant to your industry or company
  • educating other staff on social media use
  • promoting social media use within your company
  • developing strategies to increase your audience
  • using social media tools like Hootsuite, TweetDeck or Buffer to manage multiple sites
  • using web tracking tools like Google Analytics, Social Report or Bitly

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4. Salary

Starter: £23,000

Experienced: £25,000 to £35,000

Highly Experienced: £75,000 (head social media manager)

These figures are a guide.

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5. Working hours, patterns and environment

You’ll usually work normal office hours, 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday. You may need to work evenings and weekends when working on a campaign or with deadlines.

If you’re freelance, you may work longer hours depending on the needs of your clients and the amount of work you take on.

You’ll be based in an office and spend a lot of time working on a computer. You may also attend meetings and make presentations about your work to clients or colleagues.

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6. Career path and progression

With experience, you could move into managing social media for larger companies or progress to a senior or head social media manager job.

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Sport and exercise psychologist (Wk. 9 -Nov)

Following the mock interviews with Year 11 that we conducted last week, sport and psychology seemed to be two recurring themes that pupils are interested in. It is a very important industry – just think about the British cycling team and their dominance in recent Olympic games. So, what do you need? …..

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1. Entry requirements

You’ll need:

  • a British Psychological Society (BPS) accredited degree in psychology leading to the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC)
  • 12 months’ work experience in the specialism you want to work in like coaching, teaching or health promotion
  • a BPS accredited master’s degree in sport and exercise psychology
  • 2 years’ supervised practice

You’ll also need clearance from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS).

Once you’ve completed your masters degree and 2 years’ supervised practice, you’ll need to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

if you already have a degree in a subject other than psychology, you may be able to achieve GBC by completing a BPS-approved conversion course.

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2. Skills required

You’ll need:

  • excellent communication and listening skills
  • the ability to motivate people
  • good problem-solving and decision-making skills
  • the ability to organise a complex workload to meet deadlines
  • an accurate, logical and methodical approach

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3. What you’ll do

You’ll usually specialise in either sport or exercise, although you may work in both.

Sports psychologists work with teams and individuals at all levels, and help with issues like:

  • nerves and anxiety
  • self-confidence
  • concentration
  • motivation
  • sports injuries
  • aggression

Exercise psychologists’ day-to-day duties might include:

  • working in cardiac rehabilitation or GP exercise referral schemes
  • advising and counselling patients who are ill and might benefit from getting involved in regular exercise
  • working with health promotion staff to show patients the therapeutic and health benefits of exercise
  • setting up exercise programmes in workplaces, prisons and psychiatric units
  • studying the reasons that some people are more active than others

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4. Salary

Starter: £20,000 to £22,000

Experienced: £27,000 to £37,000

Highly Experienced: up to £48,000

As a consultant working with top professional athletes, you could earn up to £1,000 per day.

These figures are a guide.

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5. Working hours, patterns and environment

You’ll often work Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm. You may also need to work in the evening and at weekends to fit in with training and competitions.

Some of your work will be office based, and you may also need to travel to team premises, competition venues and clinics.

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6. Career path and progression

You could work as a full-time sport psychologist, or you could combine consultancy work with teaching and research.

As an exercise psychologist, you could work for a local health authority, or on a GP exercise referral scheme. You could also evaluate exercise programmes in workplaces, prisons or psychiatric settings.

With experience and further study you could become a senior psychologist or head of a psychology department. You could also move into teaching or lecturing.

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Set designer – Wk 8 (Nov)

As our school production is currently running, you may have been inspired to work in theatre, TV or films,  designing the sets. This is vital if the show is to be believable – and entertaining! Find out more below:

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1. Entry requirements

You’ll usually need an HND or degree in a relevant subject, like architecture, fine art, interior design or 3D design.

You could start as a designer’s assistant, art department trainee or a runner in film or TV and work your way up.

A DVD or online portfolio showcasing sets you’ve designed for amateur theatre, school plays or films would be useful.

Creative Skillset has more information on relevant courses and becoming a set designer.

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2. Skills required

You’ll need

  • creativity and imagination
  • strong practical skills like drawing and 3D model making
  • excellent attention to detail
  • the ability to work under pressure and meet deadlines
  • research skills

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3. What you’ll do

Your day-to-day duties could include:

  • studying scripts and discussing ideas with the director
  • communicating your ideas to costume, make-up, props and lighting designers
  • working out problems like lighting and scene changes
  • researching historical, contemporary or futuristic details to get the right look for the production
  • creating effective designs within the available budget
  • sketching design ideas to produce a storyboard
  • building and photographing scale models

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4. Salary

Most set designers work on a freelance basis. Freelance rates can vary widely based on the type of production and your track record.

The Broadcasting Entertainment Cinematograph and Theatre Union (BECTU) can give you advice on pay rates.

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5. Working hours, patterns and environment

Your working hours could be long and include evening and weekend work.

You’ll work in a studio, an office or from home. You may also travel to attend meetings with theatres or film and TV production companies.

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6. Career path and progression

With experience, you could work on larger and more prestigious film, TV and theatre productions.

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Health and safety adviser (Wk. 7 – Nov)

Following our visit to NIS today to learn about occupational safety and health in the workplace, here’s a more in-depth look at the job requirements of a Health & Safety Adviser.

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1. Entry requirements

You’ll usually need a a degree, MSc or postgraduate diploma recognised by the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH).

You can also take an approved degree-level qualification through:

If you don’t have a degree, you’ll usually need some relevant work experience and a qualification in health and safety recognised by IOSH.

You could study for a health and safety qualification while you’re working. You could also take a course before looking for a trainee position.

IOSH has more information about courses and careers in health and safety.

The Occupational Safety and Health Consultants Register has a list of professional bodies and examining boards.

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2. Skills required

You’ll need:

  • excellent communication and negotiation skills
  • organisational skills
  • problem solving ability
  • excellent IT skills

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3. What you’ll do

Your day-to-day tasks may include:

  • developing safety policies and procedures
  • advising and training staff on health and safety practices
  • making regular inspections
  • doing risk assessments
  • investigating and recording accidents in the workplace
  • working with relevant inspectors and trade unions

You could work in many different industries including:

  • construction and engineering
  • mining, quarrying, oil and gas exploration
  • manufacturing and services
  • chemical processing

You could also work in public services like hospitals, education and local government.

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4. Salary

Starter: £22,000 to £30,000

Experienced: £35,000 to £50,000 (manager)

Highly Experienced: £70,000 or more (senior manager)

Health and safety advisers work in all industries.

Careers in oil, gas, power, construction and IT will usually offer higher salaries.

These figures are a guide.

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5. Working hours, patterns and environment

You’ll usually work 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday. In some industries, your hours may be irregular and you could work shifts or be expected to be on-call for emergencies.

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6. Career path and progression

With experience, you could move into a management role.

You could also become a consultant and specialise in a particular area, like environmental safety. With further study you could move into research or lecturing.

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Architectural technologist (Wk. 6 – Oct)

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SO WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AN ARCHITECT AND A CHARTERED ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGIST? 

The services that they would provide for a domestic project are broadly very similar. As a broad brush attempt to differentiate, architects are generally more ‘design led’ with greater interest, experience and training in the aesthetic and spatial qualities of a project. Whereas architectural technologists have often had more experience and training in the science and technology of building, e.g. how and why they are constructed in a certain way, using certain materials.

Not surprisingly, they are in great demand, especially now that people are more concerned about the environment and the need for buildings to be eco-friendly and energy efficient.

1. Entry requirements

You’ll usually need a degree in architectural technology, or a related subject like the built environment.

Your degree course needs to be accredited by the Chartered Institute of Architectural Technologists (CIAT).

You may be able to work your way up from a qualified architectural technician (TCIAT) role.

You could get into this job through a degree apprenticeship.

 

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2. Skills required

You’ll need:

  • drawing skills and the ability to picture objects in 3D
  • management skills for leading projects
  • the ability to analyse data and read technical plans
  • computer aided design (CAD) skills
  • maths skills
  • teamworking skills

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3. What you’ll do

You’ll work on the design plans of building projects like home extensions and sports stadiums. You’ll oversee projects from start to finish.

Your day-to-day task might include:

  • assessing clients’ needs and planning work
  • collecting and reading technical data
  • creating building plans using CAD software
  • checking construction plans for possible design problems
  • leading the design process and team
  • advising clients on environmental and legal regulations
  • managing contract bids and tenders
  • giving advice to clients and the construction team on which materials and processes to use
  • checking progress and inspecting completed building work
  • advising and reporting on the maintenance and future use of completed building work

You’ll work for private architects’ practices, housing associations, property developers, and building and construction companies.

 

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4. Salary

Starter: £20,000 to £25,000

Experienced: £30,000 to £40,000

Highly Experienced: £60,000 or more

You may earn more if you’re self-employed.

These figures are a guide.

 

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5. Working hours, patterns and environment

You’ll usually work 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday, although you may sometimes have to work extra hours to meet deadlines.

You’ll be mainly office-based, but you’ll also visit clients and construction sites. Travelling to sites and meetings may mean spending time away from home.

You may need to work outdoors in all weathers. 

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6. Career path and progression

Once you have at least 2 years’ work experience, you can work towards chartered membership of the CIAT (MCIAT).

With experience you could move into management, work as a consultant or set up your own practice.

You could also work in universities or research.

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Cyber security specialist (Wk.5 Oct. 2018)

Cyber security is fast becoming one of the most important roles in the tech sector as cyber criminals and hackers become ever more sophisticated. I’m sure you will all have read about the alleged role of hackers in the American Presidential elections, for example.

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What does a cyber security specialist do? Typical employers | Qualifications and training | Key skills

Any computer connected to the internet is vulnerable to cyber attacks. Cyber security, or IT security, is the technique used to protect computers and networks from criminal intrusion. Specialists in cyber security are among the most sought-after professionals in the tech sector as businesses and governments seek to fight off an increasingly daring and ruthless cohort of global cyber criminals and hackers. Skilled and dedicated security specialists work in this field that demands a mix of artistry and technical expertise. They need to be constantly one step ahead of the hackers and organised criminals behind a new crime wave.

There is increased potential for career progression, especially in larger organisations and financial service providers. There is also scope for experienced security professionals to go into business for themselves as consultants.

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Typical duties include:

  • seeking to build in security during the development stages of software systems, networks and data centres
  • looking for vulnerabilities and risks in hardware and software
  • finding the best way to secure the IT infrastructure of an organisation
  • building firewalls into network infrastructures
  • constantly monitoring for attacks and intrusions
  • when the cyber security specialist finds a potential threat or attempted breach, closing off the security vulnerability
  • identifying the perpetrator and liaising with the police if necessary

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Typical employers of cyber security specialists

  • Network providers
  • The government
  • Banks
  • Schools and universities
  • Airlines
  • Any large organisation with a database
  • Security consultancy firms

Qualifications and training required

Both university graduates and school leavers can enter the cyber security profession. Graduates tend to need a degree related to computer science or in a STEM subject.

A number of employers run apprenticeships in cyber security, some of which involve studying towards a degree at the same time as working. To find out more about getting into IT and technology via a school leaver route, visit the IT and technology section of TARGETcareers, a website aimed at school leavers.

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Key skills for cyber security specialists

  • Strong IT skills and knowledge including hardware, software and networks
  • Meticulous attention to detail
  • Ability to use logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of IT systems
  • A forensic approach to challenges
  • A deep understanding of how hackers work and ability to keep up with the fast pace of change in the criminal cyber-underworld
  • Ability to seek out vulnerabilities in IT infrastructures

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Hotel manager (Wk 4 – Oct. 2018)

Accommodation and food are expected to be growth industries in the next few years (according to market research carried out by YouGov).  There are lots of opportunities for travel – there are hotels and guest houses in just about every country. You only have to watch TV to see the adverts for travel and hotel websites. 

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Guest house manager, hotel general manager

1. Entry requirements

There are no set requirements. You can get into this career by applying for a place on a management trainee scheme with a hotel company. You’ll normally need an HND or degree in a subject like hotel or hospitality management, though other subjects may be accepted.

Another route is to start out in a more junior position, like front of house manager or kitchen supervisor, and work your way up.

You could get into this job through an apprenticeship.

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2. Skills required

You’ll need:

  • business, marketing and communication skills
  • excellent customer service skills
  • budgeting skills

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3. What you’ll do

You’ll deal with everything from budgeting and marketing to staff recruitment and building maintenance.

You’ll be responsible for:

  • setting budgets and forecasting income
  • deciding business targets and marketing
  • fire safety and building security
  • licensing regulations as they relate to the hotel
  • overseeing larger corporate bookings and events
  • managing staffing and resources
  • organising building maintenance
  • dealing with customer complaints and comments
  • in charge of health and safety, including environmental health

In larger hotels, department managers would report to you. These departments might include housekeeping, event management, human resources, catering and maintenance.

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4. Salary

Starter: £20,000 to £35,000

Experienced: £40,000 to £50,000

Highly Experienced: £60,000

These figures are a guide.

5. Working hours, patterns and environment

Your working day will usually be office hours, 9am to 5pm, but early starts, evenings and weekends are possible. You may have to travel to meet suppliers, contractors or corporate clients.

 

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6. Career path and progression

Your career prospects will depend on the size of the business, your experience and whether you are willing to relocate.

In larger hotel chains, you could move into regional management or specialise in areas like corporate finance or training. You may also have the chance to work overseas with an international hotel group.

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