Member of Parliament (MP) Wk 16 – Feb

We were visited today by Sir Lindsay Hoyle MP, Deputy Speaker of the House of Commons, who presented an assembly to Year 10 and then took part in Parklands Question Time, where he was grilled on everything from Chorley A&E to North Korea! So, it seems only right to have MP as our Career of the Week …

Image result for deputy speaker of the house of commons

Member of Parliament, elected representative, constituency representative, politician

MPs represent people’s concerns and interests in the House of Commons.

Image result for house of commons

How to become an MP

You can get into this job through:

  • being elected

Image result for voting day uk

Volunteering and experience

Most people show their commitment through campaigning and volunteering for their party.

You can get other useful experience from:

  • serving as a local councillor
  • being active in a trade union
  • being involved in student politics
  • working as a researcher or caseworker for an existing MP

Other routes

You become a Member of Parliament (MP) by being elected in a by-election or general election. You can stand for election as a member of a political party or as an independent candidate.

Each political party has its own selection procedure. Normally, you must get the support of your party’s nominating officer before you can become the prospective candidate.

To stand for election, you’ll need to be nominated by at least 10 electors from the constituency you wish to represent. You must also pay a £500 deposit. This is returned to you if you get more than 5% of the total votes cast in your constituency.

As a candidate during an election, you’ll be expected to campaign in public and online, attend meetings, make speeches and talk to the local media. You’ll find it helpful to have some experience in one or more of these areas.

 

Image result for UK politician meeting people

More information

Career tips

You’ll need a good understanding of local and national issues, and be up to date with current affairs.

Further information

You can find more advice about becoming an MP from UK Parliament.

 

Image result for UK politician constituency office

What it takes

Skills and knowledge

You’ll need:

  • legal knowledge including court procedures and government regulations
  • knowledge of English language
  • analytical thinking skills
  • excellent verbal communication skills
  • knowledge of teaching and the ability to design courses
  • the ability to read English
  • the ability to use your initiative
  • maths knowledge
  • being able to use a computer terminal or hand-held device may be beneficial for this job.

Restrictions and requirements

You’ll need to:

  • be a British citizen, a citizen of a Commonwealth country or the Republic of Ireland
  • be over 18 years of age

Certain people are not allowed to stand as an MP, for example someone convicted of electoral fraud. You can check with the Electoral Commissionfor more information about this.

 

Image result for brexit

What you’ll do

Day-to-day tasks

You’ll attend sessions in Parliament and:

  • vote on new laws and policies
  • raise constituents’ concerns with relevant ministers
  • debate issues and raise questions

Outside Parliament, you’ll

  • talk to businesses and schools about local, national and international issues
  • speak to the media
  • attend meetings and conferences
  • hold surgeries and advice sessions in your constituency

Image result for UK politician meeting people

Working environment

You could work in government.

Your working environment may be physically and emotionally demanding and you’ll travel often and spend nights away from home.

 

Image result for UK politician

Career path and progression

General elections are held every 5 years, so it can take a long time to be elected MP.

With experience, you may get the opportunity to take on extra responsibilities like chairing committees and moving into more senior positions like party whip or even party leader.

If your political party is in power, you could go from junior minister to minister and then cabinet minister. If your party is in opposition, you could be a spokesperson on certain issues or have responsibilities in a shadow cabinet.

 

Image result for UK politician constituency office

Advertisements

Chief Inspector (Wk 15 – Feb)

A team from Chorley Police attended our Careers Fair today to talk about the role of the police and careers and opportunities within the force. Why not aim high? Find out how to become a Detective Chief Inspector, or DCI …

Chief inspectors manage operational teams in their districts like CID or neighbourhood policing, co-ordinating responses to major incidents.

Image result for police work uk major incidents

How to become a chief inspector

You can get into this job through:

  • working towards this role
  • applying directly

Work

If you’re an existing police officer, you can apply for fast-track development through the ranks. You can also apply for promotion if you’re currently an inspector.

Direct application

If you’re a middle or senior manager working in commerce or industry, and have relevant skills and experience, you can apply for the Direct Entry at Inspector or Direct Entry at Superintendent programme. You’ll usually need a degree or postgraduate qualification to apply.

The programmes last between 18 and 24 months and offer the training and support you need to make the switch from your current job to an operational police leader.

After completing the training and with several years’ experience working at operational level, you can apply to become a chief inspector.

You can find out more about this from Lead Beyond.

Image result for police work uk major incidents

More information

Further information

You can get more advice about becoming a senior officer through the College of Policing.

What it takes

Skills and knowledge

You’ll need:

  • knowledge of public safety and security
  • customer service skills
  • legal knowledge including court procedures and government regulations
  • patience and the ability to remain calm in stressful situations
  • the ability to accept criticism and work well under pressure
  • leadership skills
  • to be thorough and pay attention to detail
  • knowledge of psychology
  • being able to use a computer terminal or hand-held device may be beneficial for this job.

Image result for police work uk major incidents

Restrictions and requirements

You’ll need to:

What you’ll do

Day-to-day tasks

Your day-to-day duties could include:

  • assessing intelligence information
  • developing policing policies and tactics
  • planning the best ways to carry out operations and investigations
  • working closely with communities and professional partners
  • managing staff performance
  • reviewing law enforcement operations
  • taking charge of the response to major incidents in your area when they happen

Image result for police work uk

Working environment

You could work at a police station or in the community.

Your working environment may be physically and emotionally demanding.

You may need to wear a uniform.

Career path and progression

With experience and further training, you could move up the policing ranks from chief inspector to superintendent, and on to assistant chief constable and chief constable.

You could also work for the security services, MI5 and MI6, Civil Nuclear Constabulary or Ministry of Defence.

Audiologist (Wk 14 – Jan)

Audiologists work with children and adults who suffer from hearing loss, tinnitus, or have problems with balance.

Many pupils would like a career in the health sector, but very often, jobs such as Audiologist are overlooked. One of the things this post recommends is volunteering in a healthcare setting – and with National Volunteering Week coming up – what better time to find out more – and get involved!

Image result for audiologist

How to become an Audiologist

You can get into this job through:

  • a university course

University

You’ll need to complete a 3-year NHS Practitioner Training Programme in healthcare science (audiology).

To work as an audiologist in the private sector, you’ll need to do an audiology degree approved by the Health and Care Professions Council.

You could join the postgraduate NHS Scientist Training Programme, if you already have a science degree. This is a 3-year course in clinical science, specialising in neurosensory sciences.

Image result for audiologist

Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • 5 GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, including English, maths and sometimes a science
  • 2 or 3 A levels, including a science
  • a degree in a relevant subject for postgraduate study

More information

Volunteering and experience

You’ll find it helpful to get some paid or voluntary experience in a healthcare setting before you apply for a course.

You could contact the voluntary services co-ordinator at your local NHS trust for further advice.

Image result for audiologist

More information

Registration

Professional and industry bodies

You could register with The Registration Council for Clinical Physiologists to get access to professional development and networking opportunities.

Further information

You can find out more about becoming an audiologist from:

Image result for audiologist

What it takes

Skills and knowledge

You’ll need:

  • customer service skills
  • sensitivity and understanding
  • to be thorough and pay attention to detail
  • thinking and reasoning skills
  • knowledge of English language
  • the ability to read English
  • excellent verbal communication skills
  • knowledge of psychology
  • being able to use a computer terminal or hand-held device may be beneficial for this job.

Restrictions and requirements

You’ll need to:

Image result for audiologist

What you’ll do

Day-to-day tasks

Your day-to-day duties might include:

  • deciding on the best way to test a patient’s hearing
  • adapting tests to suit the age and ability of the patient
  • checking hearing, including sound level and frequency range
  • investigating any related medical, physical and emotional symptoms

Working environment

You could work in an NHS or private hospital.

You may need to wear a uniform.

Image result for audiologist

Career path and progression

You could go on to specialise in areas like balance rehabilitation, cochlear implants, or assisting people with learning disabilities or dual sensory loss.

With experience, you could lead a team, manage a unit, or move into a general management position in mainstream healthcare.

You could also take on a research or teaching post at a university. 

Image result for audiologist

Health trainer (Wk 13 Jan)

Health trainers promote healthy living and help people make healthier lifestyle choices. This seemed to be the ideal choice in the first week back at school – many people have over-indulged at Christmas and have resolved to be more healthy in 2019! It is also Veganuary, with lots of people trying a meat-free diet.

Image result for veganuary

Looking after the health of the nation is a growing industry, as we are living longer, but not necessarily in good health, with obesity alone costing the NHS huge sums of money.

Image result for health trainer

How to become a Health Trainer

You can get into this job through:

  • a college course
  • an apprenticeship
  • volunteering
  • applying directly

College

You could do a college course, which would teach you some of the skills and knowledge you need in this job. Relevant courses include:

  • Level 2 Award in Improving the Public’s Health
  • Level 2 Award in Nutrition for Health

Image result for health trainer at work

Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • 2 or more GCSEs at grades 9 to 3 (A* to D) for a level 2 course

More information

Apprenticeship

You can work towards this role by starting with a community sport and health officer advanced apprenticeship.

Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C), usually including English and maths, for an advanced apprenticeship

More information

Image result for health trainer jobs

Volunteering and experience

You can get into this job through voluntary experience with local community groups.

You can contact the voluntary services co-ordinator or manager at your local NHS trust for advice on voluntary opportunities.

You can also contact the National Council for Voluntary Organisations about work placements.

 

Image result for healthy eating

Direct application

You can apply directly for health trainer jobs, if you’ve got:

  • an understanding of the health issues facing the community
  • good communication skills in English and, for some jobs, a second community language
  • some GCSEs, including English

Qualifications or experience as a personal trainer, fitness instructor or dietitian can also be helpful.

More information

Further information

You can find out more about working as a health trainer from Health Careers.

Image result for health trainer

What it takes

Skills and knowledge

You’ll need:

  • knowledge of teaching and the ability to design courses
  • knowledge of English language
  • customer service skills
  • the ability to work well with others
  • excellent verbal communication skills
  • the ability to use your initiative
  • sensitivity and understanding
  • administration skills
  • being able to use a computer terminal or hand-held device may be beneficial for this job.

Restrictions and requirements

You’ll need to:

Image result for health trainer

What you’ll do

Day-to-day tasks

Your day-to-day duties might include:

  • introducing people to relevant local services
  • helping people understand how their behaviour affects their health
  • supporting and motivating individuals to change harmful habits
  • explaining the benefits of healthier food and lifestyle choices
  • recording activity levels and results, and using these to motivate clients

Working environment

You could work in an office or in the community.

Image result for health trainer

Career path and progression

With experience, you could progress to team supervisor, or senior health improvement specialist.

You could also move into related careers in health promotion or community development.

Play therapist Wk 12 – Dec

As it’s almost Christmas, this week the Career of the Week is Play Therapist (as there is obviously only one Santa and he already has plenty of elves to help him, so no real career opportunities there!)

Play therapists help children to make sense of difficult life experiences, or complex psychological issues through play.

Image result for play therapist

How to become a Play therapist

You can get into this job through:

  • a university course

University

You’ll need to complete a postgraduate qualification approved by the British Association of Play Therapists or Play Therapy UK.

Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • a degree in a relevant subject for postgraduate study
  • 2 years’ experience of working with children and families in a development role (paid or voluntary)

More information

Image result for play therapist training

More information

Registration

Career tips

It may help when looking for work to make as many contacts as you can while you’re training. Job vacancies aren’t always advertised.

Further information

The British Association of Play Therapists and Play Therapy UK have more details about this career.

 

Related image

What it takes

Skills and knowledge

You’ll need:

  • sensitivity and understanding
  • excellent verbal communication skills
  • the ability to understand people’s reactions
  • patience and the ability to remain calm in stressful situations
  • the ability to work well with others
  • to be flexible and open to change
  • the ability to accept criticism and work well under pressure
  • thinking and reasoning skills
  • Being able to use a computer terminal or hand-held device may be beneficial for this job.

Restrictions and requirements

You’ll need to:

Image result for play therapist

What you’ll do

Day-to-day tasks

Your day-to-day duties might include:

  • assessing the child’s needs
  • running therapy sessions at a regular time and place
  • making use of creative arts, like drawing, clay, sand, movement, music and therapeutic storytelling
  • communicating with children and making a connection between the signs, symbols and actions the child creates through play
  • promoting positive change in the child by helping them to help themselves

Working environment

You could work at a client’s home, at a children’s care home, at a health centre or at a school.

Your working environment may be emotionally demanding.

Image result for play therapist

Career path and progression

With experience and further training, you could supervise less experienced therapists. You might also provide a consultation service to professionals in the community.

You could move into training, lecturing or clinical supervision.

 

Image result for play therapist

Training opportunities

Apprenticeships in England

The Find an apprenticeship service can help you with your search, send alerts when new apprenticeships become available and has advice on how to apply.

GP (Doctor) Wk. 11, Dec

Following our visit to the Medical Careers Day at Runshaw and Dr. Kennedy’s talk about Medic Mentors, it seems that lots of people are interested in becoming a GP. Find out more about this very rewarding career below.

Image result for general practitioner

How to become a GP

You can get into this job through:

  • a university course

University

You’ll need to complete:

  • a 5 year degree in medicine, recognised by the General Medical Council (GMC)
  • a 2 year foundation course of general training
  • a 3 year specialist training course in general practice

If you don’t have qualifications in science, you may be able to join a 6 year degree course in medicine. This includes a 1 year pre-medical or foundation year.

When you apply for a course in medicine, you may be asked to take the UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) or the BioMedical Admissions Test (BMAT). They test the skills you’ll need on the course like critical thinking, problem solving, data analysis, communication and scientific knowledge.

Image result for training to be a doctor

Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • 3 A levels at grade A in chemistry and either biology, physics or maths, plus another academic subject
  • 7 GCSEs, including sciences, with 5 subjects at grades 9 to 7 (A* or A) and English and maths at least grade 6 to 5 (B)

More information

 

Related image

Volunteering and experience

Medical schools will also expect you to have some relevant paid or voluntary work experience. The British Medical Association (BMA) has information on finding a placement.

More information

Registration

Further information

Health Careers and the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) have more information about becoming a GP.

Related image

What it takes

Skills and knowledge

You’ll need:

  • knowledge of medicine and dentistry
  • customer service skills
  • knowledge of psychology
  • knowledge of English language
  • counselling skills including active listening and a non-judgemental approach
  • thinking and reasoning skills
  • to be thorough and pay attention to detail
  • sensitivity and understanding
  • Being able to use a computer terminal or hand-held device may be beneficial for this job.

Restrictions and requirements

You’ll need to:

 

Image result for general practitioner

What you’ll do

Day-to-day tasks

Your day-to-day tasks may include:

  • making a diagnosis
  • giving general advice
  • prescribing medicine
  • recommending treatment
  • carrying out minor surgery
  • referring patients to specialist consultants for tests and further diagnosis

Working environment

You could work at a GP practice, at a health centre or at a client’s home.

Your working environment may be emotionally demanding.

Image result for general practitioner

Career path and progression

You could move into medical work in hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, the police or the prison service.

You could also work in education, teaching students training to be GPs.

You might also get involved in local health issues, maybe as a member of a local medical committee or clinical commissioning group.

Image result for muslim doctor

Social media manager (Wk. 10, Dec)

You all use social media on a daily basis, but you could also influence what you and others see.  Whether you are a creative type or more interested in business and marketing, there could be a role for you in this fast growing sector.

Image result for social media manager

1. Entry requirements

There are no set requirements but some employers may expect you to have a degree. Relevant subjects include:

  • advertising
  • media and communications
  • digital marketing
  • journalism
  • public relations
  • business management

You could get into this job without a degree if you have the skills and experience in areas like marketing, advertising or PR.

You can do college courses in social media and business.

You could also start as an assistant manager and work your way up.

You’ll usually need some knowledge and experience of social media. To get experience you could:

  • manage your own social media profiles
  • volunteer to manage social media for a charitable organisation
  • ask to get involved in social media sites of the company you already work for

You’ll need excellent IT skills as you’ll be using social media software and tools. You’ll also need knowledge of search engine optimisation (SEO) methods and ‘key’ or ‘searched for’ words to drive more users to your social media site.

Experience of graphic design and digital editing software can help. You can use these skills to make your social media posts better by adding videos, photos and infographics.

You could get into this job through a creative and digital media apprenticeship.

iCould has a video interview with a social media assistant.

Related image

2. Skills required

You’ll need:

  • an eye for detail and the ability to work accurately
  • the ability to deal with more than one task at a time
  • creativity
  • presentation skills
  • an analytical approach to data
  • writing skills

Image result for social media manager

3. What you’ll do

You’ll monitor and upload content to sites like:

  • Facebook and Twitter
  • Instagram and Pinterest
  • YouTube and Vine

Your day-to-day duties may include:

  • updating social media sites
  • writing blogs, articles and posts
  • responding to social media posts and developing discussions
  • checking online for company mentions and customer feedback
  • searching for interesting posts, news and articles to attract site visitors
  • overseeing competitions and campaigns promoting your company
  • taking part in conferences and group chat relevant to your industry or company
  • educating other staff on social media use
  • promoting social media use within your company
  • developing strategies to increase your audience
  • using social media tools like Hootsuite, TweetDeck or Buffer to manage multiple sites
  • using web tracking tools like Google Analytics, Social Report or Bitly

Related image

4. Salary

Starter: £23,000

Experienced: £25,000 to £35,000

Highly Experienced: £75,000 (head social media manager)

These figures are a guide.

Image result for social media manager

5. Working hours, patterns and environment

You’ll usually work normal office hours, 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday. You may need to work evenings and weekends when working on a campaign or with deadlines.

If you’re freelance, you may work longer hours depending on the needs of your clients and the amount of work you take on.

You’ll be based in an office and spend a lot of time working on a computer. You may also attend meetings and make presentations about your work to clients or colleagues.

Image result for social media manager

6. Career path and progression

With experience, you could move into managing social media for larger companies or progress to a senior or head social media manager job.

Related careers

You may be interested in: