Construction manager, Wk 17 January

There have been lots of new projects opening recently in Chorley town centre, including the Reel Cinema and M&S Food. As well as all the builders, architects and so on, someone has to make sure that the work is done correctly and that the buildings are safe and the budget hasn’t spiraled out of control! That someone is the Construction or Site Manager … find out more below.

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Site manager

Construction managers organise the work on building projects, making sure it’s completed safely, within budget and on time.

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Average salary (a year)

£27,000 Starter to £70,000 Experienced

How to become a construction manager

You can get into this job through:

  • a university course
  • an apprenticeship
  • working towards this role
  • applying directly

University

You’ll usually need a foundation degree, higher national diploma or degree accredited by the Chartered Institute of Building in a subject like:

  • building studies or building engineering
  • surveying or civil engineering
  • construction engineering
  • construction site management
  • estimating

Courses are likely to include project management, economics, IT and accounts.

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Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • 1 or 2 A levels, or equivalent, for a foundation degree or higher national diploma
  • 2 to 3 A levels, or equivalent, for a degree

More information

Apprenticeship

You may be able to complete a higher or degree apprenticeship in construction management, or design and construction management.

Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • 4 or 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C) and A levels, or equivalent, for a higher or degree apprenticeship

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More information

Work

You could move into this job if you’re working as an estimator, building technician, surveyor or site supervisor and have several years’ experience in the building industry.

Direct application

You may be able to apply directly if you’ve got several years’ management experience in a related industry like civil engineering.

More information

Registration

Further information

You can find out more about becoming a construction manager from Go Construct and The Chartered Institute of Building.

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What it takes

Skills and knowledge

You’ll need:

  • knowledge of building and construction
  • maths knowledge
  • the ability to organise your time and workload
  • leadership skills
  • knowledge of engineering science and technology
  • business management skills
  • the ability to use your initiative
  • excellent verbal communication skills
  • to be able to use a computer and the main software packages competently

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Restrictions and requirements

You’ll usually need a driving licence to travel to different sites.

What you’ll do

Day-to-day tasks

Your day-to-day activities may include:

  • checking plans with architects, surveyors and engineers
  • hiring staff and buying materials
  • planning work schedules
  • monitoring building progress and costs
  • checking quality
  • reporting to clients
  • maintaining and promoting health and safety

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Working environment

You could work on a construction site or at a client’s business.

Your working environment may be outdoors in all weathers, at height and you may spend nights away from home.

You may need to wear protective clothing.

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Career path and progression

With experience, you could progress into contract management or consultancy. With further training, you could move into support services like health and safety and building inspection.

You can improve your career prospects by getting chartered status, through an industry body like the The Chartered Institute of Building.

Ecologist, Wk 16 January

We have all been watching the devastating fires in Australia that have been raging for months, destroying lives, wildlife and the environment. Jobs like this one will become more and more important in future years as we try to halt or reverse climate change.

Ecologists study the relationship between plants, animals and the environment.

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Average salary (a year)

£19,000 Starter to £45,000 Experienced

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How to become an ecologist

You can get into this job through:

  • a university course
  • an apprenticeship

University

You’ll need a degree or postgraduate qualification in a subject like:

  • ecology
  • conservation biology
  • zoology
  • marine biology
  • environmental science
  • ecology and environmental sustainability

Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • 2 to 3 A levels, or equivalent, for a degree
  • a degree in a relevant subject for postgraduate study

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More information

Apprenticeship

You may be able to do a postgraduate ecologist degree apprenticeship.

You’ll need a qualification and experience in an ecological science to apply.

Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • a degree in a relevant subject for a degree apprenticeship

More information

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Volunteering and experience

Volunteering is a great way to get experience and may improve your chances of finding work. You can also build up contacts within conservation, which will be useful when looking for jobs.

You can find volunteering opportunities with:

More information

Professional and industry bodies

You can join the British Ecological Society, which offers mentoring from experienced ecologists, research news, and education and job search support.

Further information

You can find more details about careers in ecology through the British Ecological Society and the Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management.

 

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What it takes

Skills and knowledge

You’ll need:

  • maths knowledge
  • analytical thinking skills
  • the ability to read English
  • thinking and reasoning skills
  • excellent verbal communication skills
  • to be thorough and pay attention to detail
  • ambition and a desire to succeed
  • the ability to use your initiative
  • to be able to use a computer and the main software packages competently

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What you’ll do

Day-to-day tasks

Your day-to-day duties could include:

  • carrying out fieldwork – surveying and recording information on plants, animals, environmental conditions and biodiversity
  • researching the impact of human activity, like housing and intensive agriculture, on the environment
  • building computer models to predict the effects of development or climate change monitoring pollution
  • managing wildlife conservation areas, woodland and meadows

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Working environment

You could work in the countryside, at a university, in an office or in a laboratory.

Your working environment may be outdoors in all weathers.

Career path and progression

With experience, you could become a senior ecologist, leading a team of researchers, developing biodiversity plans or acting as a consultant on sustainable development projects.

You may also be able to apply for chartered environmentalist status. You can find out more about being a chartered environmentalist from the Society for the Environment.

 

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Sports development officer, Wk 15, January 2020

I’m sure after the excesses of Christmas, many people have resolved to eat healthy food and take more exercise – but did you know that you can help people to do this as a job? Earlier this week, we welcomed an ex-pupil, Mark Bromilow, into school to talk about his varied and fascinating career path. Following service in the military and latterly, as a private bodyguard, he has maintained an interest in fitness and has recently become World Powerlifting Champion! He also runs his own business (Commando Strength) encouraging people to take up sports and get fitter.

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Sports development officers organise projects and training to encourage people to take part in sport and have a healthier lifestyle.

Average salary (a year)

£21,000 Starter to £50,000 Experienced

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How to become a sports development officer

You can get into this job through:

  • a university course
  • an apprenticeship
  • volunteering
  • applying directly

University

You’ll find it useful to have a foundation degree, higher national diploma or degree in a related subject like:

  • sports development
  • sports coaching
  • sports science

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Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • 1 or 2 A levels, or equivalent, for a foundation degree or higher national diploma
  • 2 to 3 A levels, or equivalent, for a degree

More information

Apprenticeship

You can work towards this role by starting with an advanced apprenticeship as a community sport and health officer.

Entry requirements

Employers will set their own entry requirements.

More information

Volunteering and experience

You can get useful experience by playing sports, volunteering as a coach, helping out on community and holiday sports schemes, or working with a local sports club.

This can help to build up your confidence and may lead to getting professional coaching qualifications.

Direct application

You can apply directly for jobs if you’ve got some of the relevant skills and knowledge needed for this role, for example through coaching qualifications.

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More information

Career tips

There’s a lot of competition for jobs, so networking and making contacts will give you more chance of finding work.

Further information

You can find out more about careers in sport from The British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences.

UK Coaching has more on how to get coaching qualifications in any sport.

 

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What it takes

Skills and knowledge

You’ll need:

  • patience and the ability to remain calm in stressful situations
  • the ability to work well with others
  • sensitivity and understanding
  • leadership skills
  • to be thorough and pay attention to detail
  • the ability to work on your own
  • knowledge of English language
  • knowledge of teaching and the ability to design courses
  • to be able to carry out basic tasks on a computer or hand-held device

Restrictions and requirements

You’ll need to:

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What you’ll do

Day-to-day tasks

Your day-to-day duties may include:

  • finding and training staff, coaches and volunteers for projects
  • promoting and running projects and activities
  • monitoring and evaluating projects
  • finding funding, managing resources and budgets
  • putting local and national policies into practice
  • attending meetings, seminars and conferences
  • coaching or supervising sport

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Working environment

You could work in an office, at a school, on a sports field, at a fitness centre or at a college.

Your working environment may be outdoors some of the time.

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Career path and progression

With experience you could become a sports development manager or a regional manager.

The 12 Jobs of Christmas, Wk 14, Dec.

I thought we’d have a break from the usual Career of the Week suggestions and go festive! Back to normal service in January – in the meantime, have a great Christmas and New Year.

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The festive season has officially begun; the markets are up, the lights are switched on, and the hustle of Christmas shopping is in full swing. It is the most joyful but also one of the busiest times of the year.

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On the first day of Christmas, team Joblift gave to you … the 12  jobs of Christmas. The following weird and wonderful jobs have each played/ play an essential role during the festive season.

Wreath maker

Hanging a wreath on a door has been a tradition for many years. Some see it as a decoration, some give it a religious or a cultural meaning. All of the festive wreaths you see around cities and in the shops were created by wreath makers. These wreaths are handmade with love and make the festive season even more special. To become a wreath maker, you don’t need to have any specific qualifications, as you will be trained before you start!

Sprout Picker

Ah, the most popular vegetable during the Christmas season, the Brussels sprout. They are as important as a traditional element on the plate as the turkey or the stuffing. Somebody has to be accountable for picking them from a farm and delivering to the local supermarket, for this task companies and farmers employ sprout pickers.

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Mince Pie Chef

You wouldn’t believe it, but being a mince pie chef is a job that is required every year two months before Christmas. Mince pies are an original British pie that has been a part of the Christmas season since the 13th century. Nowadays, 370 million mince pies are sold in the UK over the Christmas period annually. So, if you’re a pastry chef or like to bake, why not apply for this job next year?

Lumberjack

What is Christmas without a Christmas tree? The markets where you can buy the main element of the festivities open in mid-November. For that to happen, the trees need to be cut down and delivered, which is the job of a lumberjack. They make Christmas happen, by delivering us the main festive essential. In history, the trees were cut down using the human strength with an axe, but nowadays they’ve switched their axes for machines.

Market Stall Traders

Christmas Markets are what many people wait for during this time of year. The opening of Winter Wonderland in London and local Christmas markets just set everyone in the holiday mood. Visiting one is a must-do activity, therefore many stall holders require extra staff to work during the holiday season. Such jobs are popular, and what better way to get yourself into the Christmas spirit than in a place filled with all things festive?

Christmas reindeer walker

Reindeer Walker

The legend says that for Santa to deliver all his presents, he rides a sleigh with nine reindeer. Blitzen, Dasher, Dancer, Donner, Comet, Cupid, Prancer, Vixen and Rudolph all need to be taken care of and that is a job for the reindeer walkers. Seriously, you can play around with the animals, take them for walks, groom and feed them, and get paid for it… what a dream come true.

Christmas Cracker writer

Christmas crackers are an essential part to any British Christmas Dinner. Pull it apart and you will usually find a paper crown, a small toy and a Christmas joke. But have you ever wondered who comes up with the jokes? A company that produces crackers often hires Christmas cracker writers to come up with funny original jokes. But, the crackers were introduced over 150 years ago and many jokes haven’t been changed since.

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Christmas Card Writer

Billions of Christmas cards are sent every year to express well wishes and excitement of the festive season with loved ones. Everybody is on the hunt for an original greeting message to stand out amongst all the other cards. The role of a professional card writer is to present customers with a unique card and message. You must have great communication and writing skills and be creative and innovative. If you have what it takes then why not try your hand at Content Writing, and the best part is that it’s an all-season job.

Christmas Tree Decorator

Land yourself a seasonal job decorating a Christmas Tree! If you love to decorate then why not get paid for it too. Many commercial stores hire holiday designers to attract customers and spread the Christmas spirit. You always have to make sure that the main lady aka the Christmas tree is in its best shape and form.

Queen’s Speechwriter

Every British family gathers at 3 pm on Christmas Day to watch the most important speech of the year. Broadcast since the early 20th century, the Queen’s speech has become a Christmas tradition. It is clear that the Queen does not write her speeches, due to the number of obligations that come alongside it. You normally have to be a well-respected professional author to be able to work at such a position, and currently, it is the government duty.

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Dollmaker

Santa’s coming to town to deliver all the presents children have asked for on Christmas Eve. The day turns into a fairytale when children received their much-desired dolls. But, to make that happen in the olden days, people were required to work in the worst conditions possible when the job was hard in itself. Each doll was moulded and then hand painted with precision. Nowadays, that job is done by the machines creating more jobs in factories and making it easier for the parents to choose the toys.

Puke Collector

The Royals are known for their famous Christmas banquets throughout the years. But, did you know that a puke collector was once a Christmas job. Collecting vomit sounds like one of the worst Christmas related jobs in recorded history, but it was apparently a much-needed role. Due to guests having loads of wine with their food, very often accidents happened. Usually, this job was given to children who are quick and savvy.

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It’s not too late to get a seasonal job (maybe not as a puke collector) this Christmas? Earn some extra cash and get into the festive spirit now!

Author: Polina Halabitska

Born in Ukraine, raised in the UK and now chasing her dreams in Germany. Die-hard lover of sushi, chow chows and adventures.

Market research executive, Wk 13 Dec.

Related imageWe all know what has been happening this week – in fact, Parklands students even held their own election – but for weeks the opinion polls have been telling us who is in the lead or who is gaining ground.  Who are the mysterious people behind these opinion polls? And what do they really do? Read on for the answer!

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Market research executives help clients find out about people’s views on consumer products or political and social issues.

Average salary (a year)

£20,000 Starter to £60,000 Experienced

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How to become a market research executive

You can get into this job through:

  • a university course
  • a college course
  • an apprenticeship
  • working towards this role
  • a graduate training scheme
  • specialist courses run by professional bodies
  • an internship

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University

For quantitative market research work, you may find it useful to get a degree in:

  • maths
  • statistics
  • business
  • management
  • economics

For qualitative jobs, you may find it helpful to have a degree in:

  • psychology
  • sociology
  • geography
  • social sciences
  • anthropology

Also useful are degrees in English, marketing, and sciences, or engineering for some specialist industrial jobs.

Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • 2 to 3 A levels, or equivalent, for a degree

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More information

College

You could do a college course, which would teach you some of the skills you need in this job. Relevant courses include:

  • Level 3 Diploma in Marketing
  • Level 4 Diploma in Professional Marketing

Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • 4 or 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C), or equivalent, for a level 3 course
  • 1 or 2 A levels, a level 3 diploma or relevant experience for a level 4 or level 5 course

More information

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Apprenticeship

You could do a marketing executive higher apprenticeship, which includes training in market research.

Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • 4 or 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C) and A levels, or equivalent, for a higher or degree apprenticeship

More information

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Work

You could work as a market research assistant, or interviewer, with or without a degree. You’ll still need very good communication skills, and ability with numbers and IT programs.

You could also start as a research assistant in an agency, and get promotion to executive or account manager as your experience grows. You’ll usually be expected to take further qualifications.

Other routes

You could get your first job as a market research executive through one of the graduate training schemes that some larger employers run for new recruits.

You could also do specialist courses through professional bodies, like The Market Research Society’s Certificate in Market and Social Research.

You may be able to get a paid internship with a company, where you’re given a project to complete. This will allow you to develop your skills and show an employer what you’re able to do.

 

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More information

Career tips

Being able to speak different languages could be an advantage for international work.

Whatever your qualifications, you’ll find it useful to have experience in marketing, sales or advertising, or as a market research interviewer.

Further information

You can find out more about market research careers from The Market Research Society.

 

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What it takes

Skills and knowledge

You’ll need:

  • analytical thinking skills
  • to be thorough and pay attention to detail
  • the ability to use your initiative
  • customer service skills
  • knowledge of English language
  • ambition and a desire to succeed
  • persistence and determination
  • excellent verbal communication skills
  • to be able to use a computer and the main software packages confidently

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What you’ll do

Day-to-day tasks

Your day-to-day duties may include:

  • meeting clients to discuss research projects
  • creating plans or proposals and presenting them to clients
  • managing a budget
  • designing questionnaires and organising surveys
  • briefing interviewers and researchers
  • monitoring the progress of surveys
  • analysing data and presenting results to clients
  • advising clients how they can best use the research

Working environment

You could work in an office or at a client’s business.

Career path and progression

You could move into management, or become a self-employed market research consultant.

You could also work in advertising or marketing promotions.

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Veterinary physiotherapist, Wk 12, Dec

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As we are on the countdown to Christmas, I thought we would have a look at an animal-related career. We all know a dog is for life, not just for Christmas – and a veterinary physiotherapist can help to ensure that your pet has a healthy, happy, pain-free life (obviously applies to reindeers as well…)

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Animal physiotherapist

Veterinary physiotherapists work with injured animals, or animals with movement problems, to help reduce pain and improve their health.

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Average salary (a year)

£18,500 Starter to £65,000 Experienced

How to become a veterinary physiotherapist

You can get into this job through:

  • a university course
  • an apprenticeship
  • specialist courses run by private training organisations

University

You’ll need one of the following qualifications:

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Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C), or equivalent, including English, maths and science
  • 2 or 3 A levels, or equivalent, including biology for a degree
  • a degree in a relevant subject for postgraduate study

More information

Apprenticeship

You can start by doing a physiotherapist degree apprenticeship. You will then complete a postgraduate award in veterinary physiotherapy.

Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • 2 to 3 A levels, or equivalent, preferably including biology, for a degree apprenticeship

More information

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Other routes

You could train in animal massage or animal hydrotherapy, if you do not have a degree but want to work in a related area.

You can get more details about training from the:

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More information

Professional and industry bodies

You can join the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Animal Therapy for professional development and training opportunities.

Further information

You can find out more about becoming a veterinary physiotherapist from:

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What it takes

Skills and knowledge

You’ll need:

  • sensitivity and understanding
  • to enjoy working with other people
  • customer service skills
  • patience and the ability to remain calm in stressful situations
  • analytical thinking skills
  • counselling skills including active listening and a non-judgemental approach
  • to be flexible and open to change
  • knowledge of psychology
  • to be able to carry out basic tasks on a computer or hand-held device

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What you’ll do

Day-to-day tasks

On a day-to-day basis you’ll be:

  • planning exercise programmes
  • using manual and electro-therapy methods to reduce pain and help with movement
  • applying massage and hydrotherapy techniques
  • giving advice on changes to animals’ environments

Working environment

You could work at a veterinary practice or at a university.

Your working environment may be physically demanding.

You may need to wear a uniform.

 

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Career path and progression

With experience, you could become a senior physiotherapist, or a specialist physiotherapist for breathing conditions or problems affecting the nervous system.

You could also set up your own animal physiotherapy practice or move into research.

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Finance officer Wk. 11, November

We have all heard recently about how much each political party is going to spend or borrow in the next few years – but who keeps an eye on this spending? If you become a finance officer, it could be you!

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Financial officer, finance clerk, treasurer

Finance officers help to manage the finances of an organisation by keeping track of its income and controlling its spending.

Average salary (a year)

£18,500 Starter to £40,000 Experienced

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How to become a finance officer

You can get into this job through:

  • a university course
  • a college course
  • an apprenticeship
  • working towards this role
  • applying directly

University

Some employers may ask for a relevant degree in a subject like:

  • finance
  • accounting
  • business studies

Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • 2 to 3 A levels, or equivalent, for a degree

More information

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College

You may find it useful to do a college course, which could help you get a trainee job with a financial firm. Courses inlcude:

  • Level 2 Certificate in Bookkeeping
  • Level 2 Certificate in Accounting
  • Level 3 Certificate in Financial Studies

Entry requirements

Entry requirements for these courses vary.

More information

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Apprenticeship

You can get into this job through an assistant accountant advanced apprenticeship.

Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C) or equivalent, including English and maths, for an advanced apprenticeship

More information

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Work

You could start out as a finance assistant or accounts assistant and then work your way into this role after getting experience.

Direct application

If you want to apply directly for jobs you’ll usually need GCSEs, including maths and English.

A levels in maths, business studies or economics may also be useful.

More information

Further information

You can find out more about careers in finance from The London Institute of Banking and Finance.

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What it takes

Skills and knowledge

You’ll need:

  • knowledge of economics and accounting
  • business management skills
  • maths knowledge
  • analytical thinking skills
  • financial management skills
  • leadership skills
  • the ability to use your initiative
  • to be thorough and pay attention to detail
  • to be able to carry out basic tasks on a computer or hand-held device

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What you’ll do

Day-to-day tasks

Your day-to-day duties could include:

  • recording financial transactions on computer systems
  • producing financial forecasts
  • dealing with payroll, invoices, expenses and VAT
  • carrying out financial audits
  • creating monthly, quarterly and annual budget reports
  • presenting report findings to finance managers

Working environment

You could work in an office.

Career path and progression

With experience, you could become a senior finance officer or finance manager, or train to become an accountant.

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